The “Coworking Code of Conduct”

Sensei Cat Johnson calls attention this month to the “Coworking Code of Conduct”, which is a template policy document intended to be used as a model for coworking spaces to use.

The document is undated and unsigned, but is promulgated by Cobot and other coworking operators (and CJ).  The document cites other similar templates that inspired this particular template.

The main thrust of the template is the kind of workplace code of conduct that many conventional organizations promulgate.  Anyone who has worked or gone to school anywhere should already be familiar with these policies.  (This document doesn’t consider kidful environments, which would have additional wrinkles involving interactions between adults with children, and the rights and needs of parents.)

The thing is, of course, that in a conventional office, the employer is in charge of both the space and the workers, so responsibility for the policy and its enforcement are clear. (In many cases, there are legal obligations for employers to enforce such policies.)  In a coworking space, the workers don’t work for the space, so it isn’t necessarily clear who sets and enforces the rules of the workplace.

This policy template essentially encourages the workspace operator to take up this aspect of running the space, even though there isn’t a clear legal requirement to do so.

Yet another important responsibility for community leaders….

What effect would such a policy have?

Obviously, a well-functioning community of coworkers probably doesn’t need any such a formal policy, because they’ll be treating each other with respect already.  But not all communities work smoothly all the time, and workers come and go all the time, so things can change at any moment. In addition, there will inevitably be differences of opinion, such as what is or isn’t “appropriate” talk or touching, so conflict resolution may be needed.  Notably, the code calls for the workspace operator to create mechanisms for mediation, which are probably a good idea anyway.

This document is intended as a template to be adapted for specific workplaces. It will be interesting to see how it might be used by coworking spaces serving specific communities, such as women or first peoples or whatever.  These spaces are balancing the goals of being congenial and/or safe for specific communities, with a desire to be open to everyone.  The generic template about incusion might be too little or totally off target for these communities, I dunno.

If nothing else, this document should make coworking operators and community leaders think about this issue in their own community.  Even if a community is functioning fine, there may be improvements to make.


Coworking Code of Conduct